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SHORT 330

The NTSB is investigating the May 5, 2017, crash of a Short Brothers 330 twin-engine turboprop on landing at Yeager Airport, Charleston, WV. The airplane ran off the end of the runway and down a hillside. The pilot and co-pilot were killed. The airplane had been en route from Louisville, KY. It was carrying cargo and was under contract to United Parcel Service. The ceiling was reported to be a 500 foot overcast, but visibility was 10 miles at the time. The accident occurred shortly before 7 a.m.

BELLANCA

 

On April 24, 2017, at 1339 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-31 airplane collided with high tension power lines and impacted terrain while attempting to land at the Jesse Viertel Memorial Airport (VER), Boonville, Missouri. The pilot and passenger were both fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned and operated by Select Airplane, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that operated without a flight plan.

The airport manager witnessed the accident sequence. He reported that he saw the airplane very low on final approach for runway 18. As the airplane continued towards the airport, he saw it abruptly pitch nose low and descend into the terrain. He immediately contacted emergency service and went to provide aid.

Damage to the power lines were consistent with the airplane colliding with a power line from a set of power lines that were about 75 ft above ground level and about a ½ mile north of the approach end of runway 18. Additional damage to two power lines that were about 15 ft above ground level was found about 110 ft south of the first power line. A subsequent impact crater on the northern shoulder of a 2-lane road, was located about 8 feet south of the second set of struck power lines. The airplane had come to rest inverted on south side of the road, with the nose pointing towards the opposite direction of travel. All major components were located at the accident site.

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the accident.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

 

CESSNA 421C

 

On April 25, 2017, about 1038 central daylight time, a Cessna model 421C was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain near Huntsville, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane sustained impact and fire damage to all structural components. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Klass Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a post-maintenance test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Lone Star Executive Airport, Conroe, Texas, at an unconfirmed time.

A witness, who was an off-duty police officer, reported seeing the airplane flying in a westerly direction about 150 feet above the ground. He said that the airplane banked left about 45 degrees and he noticed that the left propeller of the airplane was not turning and the airplane was losing altitude. Suspecting a problem, the officer got into his car and in doing so, he heard the operating engine either idle down or shut off completely. The airplane then went out of sight behind a tree line and the officer observed a large plume of smoke. The officer added that when the airplane passed over his residence the flaps appeared to be retracted or at a very low angle and the landing gear was in the retracted position. He noted that the right engine did not did not sound as though it was sputtering or experiencing difficulties until he heard it idle down. He further noted that he did not see any smoke coming from the aircraft as it passed overhead.

The impacted trees and terrain before coming to rest inverted in a shallow ranch pond. The lower portion of the fuselage and the wings remained above the surface of the water and showed evidence of fire damage. Based on the tree impact, the airplane was traveling in a southerly direction when the impact occurred. On-scene examination of the airplane was not possible due to its location in the pond and further examination will be conducted after removal from the accident site.

 

 

MIDAIR

 

The NTSB is investigating the April 1, 2017, midair collision of a Cessna 170 and a Grumman American AA5B at Edgewater, FL.

The pilots of both aircraft were killed. It is believed none else was

onboard. There were no fatalities on the ground.

The collision took place about 3 miles north of Massey Airpark at New Smyrna Beach, FL.

 

CESSNA 210

 

Four people were reported killed in the March 25, 2017, crash of a Cessna

210 airplane at Hayden, AL. The airplane had departed Kissimmee, FL, and was en route to Jackson, TN. Witnesses told investigators that

the airplane broke up in flight. NTSB investigators documented that pieces of  wreckage were widely separated. 

 

CITATION

 

A Cessna Citation jet crashed on March 24, 2017, in Marietta, GA. The airplane was en route to Fulton County Airport at Atlanta from Wilmington, DE. The pilot, who was believed to be the only occupant, was killed. The

airplane crashed into a house. No one was in the structure at the time.

The NTSB is investigating.

 

CESSNA 421

 

A twin-engine Cessna 421 crashed just after midnight on March 4, 2017, at the Cherokee County Regional Airport, Ball Grand, Georgia. The pilot, who was the only occupant, received fatal injuries. The airplane struck wires and a telephone pole before impacting the ground. It is believed that the pilot was attempting to land at the time of the accident.

 

BEECH BE-60

 

Two peope were killed in the March 4, 2017, crash of  Beechcraft

BE-60 at Duette, Florida, in eastern Manatee County. The airplane

had departed the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport about

a half-hour before the accident. There was a post crash fire which

affected approximately 30 acres of vegetation and brush.

  

SONEX

 

The pilot who died in the February 28, 2017, crash of a single-engine

Sonex into the roof of a condominium in Methuen, Massachusetts, has been identified as former Newburyport, Massachusetts, Mayor

Alan Lavender, age 73.

 

The crash site was must across the Merrimack River from Lawrence Airport. The NTSB is investigating. The pilot was on approach for

landing at Lawrence when the accident occurred. It is not believed he made a distress call prior to the accident. 

 

CESSNA 310

 

The NTSB is investigating the February 27, 2017, crash of a Cessna 310 into two houses about a half-mile from the Riverside, California, municipal airport. Three people on the airplane were known to have

been killed. One survivor, a teenage girl, was ejected from the airplane and survived with minor injuries. The airplane had taken off from Riverside and was en route to San Jose. Reports said the

airplane's occupants had flown to Riverside for a cheerleading conference.   

 

 

COLUMBIA LC41-550FG

 

Two people were killed in the January 5, 2017, crash of a

single-engine Columbia LC41-550FG at Gurdon, AR. The

airplane was en route from McKinney, TX, to Franklin, NC.

The pilot reported engine trouble shortly before the airplane

was observed on radar descending from about FL250 to about 5,000 feet. It then was lost from radar according to preliminary

information. The NTSB is investigating.

 

C210

 

The NTSB is investigating the crash of a Cessna 210 at

Phoenix, AZ, on January 2, 2017. All four people onboard

were killed. The airplane was reported missing and

a search was launched early on January 3rd. A cell phone

belonging to one of the occupants was "pinged" and the

signal helped locate the accident scene. The airplane

was en route from Scottsdale, AZ, to Telluride, CO. 

 

MIDAIR

 

A midair collision occurred near Aero County Airport,

McKinney, TX, late in the afternoon of December 31, 2016.

The airport is uncontrolled, and neither pilot was in contact

with Air Traffic Control. The types of aircraft involved could

not immediately be determined. All three people on board both

airplanes were killed. The NTSB is investigating.

 

VIENNA, IL

 

Four people have been reported killed in the crash of

a single-engine Piper PA-28 at Vienna, IL. The accident

occurred on December 31, 2016. The NTSB is investigating.

 

CESSNA SINGLE-ENGINE

 

All four people on board a single-engine Cessna were killed

when it crashed December 29, 2016, in the Hood Canal area near

Olympia, WA. The airplane was en route from Boeing Field to Port Angeles, WA. No specifics as to the model of airplane were immediately available. An ELT signal helped search crews locate the crash site. NTSB

investigators were expected to arrive on-scene on Saturday, 12/31/16.

 

CITATION 525

 

There was no immediate sign of wreckage from the Cessna

Citation 525 jet which was lost from contact with ATC

shortly after takeoff from Burke Lakefront Airport,

Cleveland, OH, at about 11:50 p.m. December 29, 2016.

It is believed the airplane crashed into Lake Erie and

sank about two miles from shore. There were no signs of

survivors. Initial reports indicated there were six people

on board, including family members of one of them who was

the CEO of Superior Beverage Group and owned the airplane

through a corporation. The airplane was based at Ohio State University Airport in Columbus, OH, and was en route there. The NTSB will

investigate.

 

C182H

 

The wreckage of a Cessna 182H which was reported missing

December 26, 2016, on a flight from Jacksonville, FL, to

Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge Airport on Tennessee has been

discovered. the plane crashed in remote terrain in the

Great Smoky Mountains National Park. All three people

on the airplane were killed. The NTSB is investigating.

 

EPIC LT

 

Two people were killed December 27, 2016, in the crash of an Epic LT at Spruce Creek Airport, Port Orange, FL. The LT is a high-performance single-engine turboprop with six seats. It is a low-wing design, with retractable gear. The airplane was en route from Millington Regional Airport in Tennessee. The NTSB is investigating.

 

MEDICAL FLIGHT

 

The NTSB is investigating the Nov. 18, 2016, crash of a twin-engine

PA-31 at Elko, NV, in which all four onboard were killed. The airplane was being operated by American Medflight as an air ambulance flight.

The airplane carried the pilot, two medical personnel and a

patient.

 

SAFETY ALERT

 

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a Safety Alert to pilots with suggestions on what they can do to reduce their chances of being involved in a midair collision.

In an effort to illustrate the limitations of the “see and avoid” concept of aircraft separation, the NTSB created a series of animations depicting the pilots’ visual field of view from each of the four airplanes involved in two midair collisions that were investigated by the NTSB in 2015.

The animations show how difficult it can be for pilots to spot converging aircraft that may present a midair collision risk in a dynamic visual environment.

Using 3-D laser equipment, investigators scanned the cockpit windows and surrounding airplane structure of four exemplar airplanes involved in the two midair collisions to create animations that, combined with radar data, provided an approximation of what each pilot likely saw before the crashes. Investigators also used radar data to reconstruct how in-cockpit technology that provides pilots with graphical and aural alerts of nearby traffic could have made the pilots aware of the approaching aircraft and possibly prevented the collisions.

“These accidents and the animations clearly demonstrate the safety benefit of augmenting pilots’ vision with technological safety nets,” said NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart. “Technologies in the cockpit that warn of traffic conflicts through displays or alerts can help pilots become aware of, and maintain separation from, nearby aircraft, even if they have difficulty seeing them.”

On July 7, 2015, a Cessna 150 that had just departed from Moncks Corner, South Carolina, and an F-16 Air Force fighter jet on a training mission collided. An air traffic controller advised the F-16 pilot that the Cessna was a potential traffic conflict. The F-16 pilot was not able to visually acquire the Cessna until it was too late to avoid the collision. The two occupants of the Cessna were killed; the F-16 pilot ejected and survived. The NTSB determined that the probable cause of the crash was the air traffic controller’s failure to provide an appropriate resolution to the traffic conflict.

On August 16, 2015, a North American Rockwell Sabreliner inbound for landing at Brown Field Municipal Airport in San Diego and a Cessna 172 that was practicing landings at the same airport collided. The four occupants of the Sabreliner and the sole occupant of the Cessna were killed. A cockpit visibility study revealed the fields of view of both pilots were limited and partially obscured at times. The NTSB determined that the probable cause of the accident was the air traffic controller’s failure to properly identify the aircraft in the pattern and to ensure control instructions were being performed.

The NTSB said that contributing to both accidents were the inherent limitations of the “see and avoid” concept of traffic separation. These limitations, combined with errors by the air traffic controllers, resulted in the pilots’ inability to take action to avoid the collisions.

The Safety Alert highlights the value of traffic avoidance technologies to pilots as an aid to detecting and avoiding other airplanes in flight. Such technologies also serve as another layer of safety in the case of air traffic control errors, such as those referenced in the two accidents above.

In addition to issuing the Safety Alert, the NTSB made recommendations to the Federal Aviation Administration and the three companies operating federal contract control towers in the U.S., asking them to brief air traffic controllers on the errors in the two midair collisions and to include these accidents as examples in initial and recurrent training.

 

 

FLIGHT 383

 

As part of its ongoing investigation of an Oct. 28, 2016, uncontained engine failure on American Airlines flight 383, the National Transportation Safety Board issued an investigative update Friday, Nov. 14, 2016.

The uncontained failure of a GE CF6-80C2B6 engine occurred on a Boeing 767-300 (N345AN) during the take-off roll at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. An emergency evacuation of the 161 passengers and nine crewmembers onboard was conducted.

Initial findings include the following:

According to witness statements from airport personnel, video evidence, flight data recorder (FDR) data and GPS data, the accident flight started its takeoff roll on runway 28R at the intersection with taxiway N5.

The airplane experienced an uncontained failure of the right engine about 6,550 feet from runway 28R threshold, and came to a full stop about 9,225 feet from runway 28R threshold.

Preliminary FDR data show that the right engine failure
occurred at an airspeed of about 128 knots with the engine 
operating at takeoff power.

Approximately two seconds after the engine failure, at an 
airspeed of about 134 knots, the left and right engine throttle 
lever angles decreased rapidly. Coincident with the throttle 
movement, brake pressure rose in a manner consistent with maximum 
autobrake application; the auto speedbrakes were extended.

The aircraft rapidly decelerated, coming to a stop about 25 seconds 
after the throttle reduction.

As a result of the uncontained engine failure, a fuel leak resulted in a 
pool fire under the right wing.

Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting personnel began applying foam within 
2 minutes 51 seconds of being notified of the emergency.

The right engine stage 2 high pressure turbine disk fractured into at 
least 4 pieces (locations A, B, C, and D on figure). One piece went through 
the inboard section of the right wing, over the fuselage and into 
a UPS warehouse facility (location A). 

The majority of the stage 2 disk was recovered and sent to the NTSB 
laboratory in Washington, DC for examination. One of the fractures exhibited features 
consistent with fatigue cracking initiating at an internal inclusion near the forward 
side of the hub’s inner bore.

Engine and wing debris were found in the area around the gouge mark on the runway.

3-D imaging of the damage to the right wing has been completed. 

All members of the cabin crew has been interviewed.

The disk had 10,984 cycles and had a life limit of 15,000 cycles. Review of the 
engine maintenance and manufacturing records and processes are ongoing. 

Daily progress meetings are being held and the final documentation and examination 
of the airplane and engine continues in Chicago; the on-scene team plans to finish 
work by this weekend.

NTSB Senior Air Safety Investigator Lorenda Ward, the Investigator-in-Charge, is 
leading a team with expertise in the areas of airworthiness, powerplants, structures, 
survival factors, maintenance records, flight recorders and metallurgy. The flight data 
recorder and the cockpit voice recorder were transported to the NTSB Recorder Laboratory 
where the information from each was downloaded.

Parties to the investigation include the Federal Aviation Administration, 
American Airlines, Allied Pilots Association, The Boeing Company, General Electric Engines, 
the Transport Workers Union of America and the Association of Professional Flight Attendants.

Ongoing metallurgical examinations of the disk will focus on detailed characterization of 
the inclusion and the fracture surfaces. 

PIPER CHEROKEE
 
The NTSB is investigating the October 16, 2016, crash of a  
Piper Cherokee near Austin, PA, in which all three people on
board were killed. The airplane was en route to St. Catherine's/
Niagara District Airport, Ontario, Canada, from Richmond, VA.
At about 7pm, the pilot advised ATC that they were maneuvering
to avoid a thunderstorm. The wreckage was found the following
day in mountainous terrain.
 
HAWKER 125
 
The NTSB has adopted a probable cause of the Nov. 10, 2015, crash
of a Hawker HS-125 jet into an apartment building in Akron, OH. All
nine people on the airplane were killed. There were no fatalities
on the ground. The Safety Board blamed the accident on the
unstabilized non-precision approach which was flown and the captain's
failure to call for or execute a go-around. The first officer was the flying
pilot. The Safety Board also found fault with the FAA's oversight of 
the flight's operator, ExecuFlight, as well as the company's failure
to provide adequate training to its pilots. 
 
 
PA-34
 
NTSB investigators were expected to arrive Wednesday at the crash site
in East Hartford, CT, where a PA-34 twin-engine Seneca crashed while on approach
to Hartford-Brainard Airport on Tuesday 10/11/16. The pilot survived, while the 
pilot-rated passenger was killed. The FBI has joined the investigation, 
following an indication from the pilot that the crash was not an accident. It
was subsequently determined that the pilot-rated passenger was intent
upon committing suicide. The pilot-rated passenger was identified as 
Feras M. Freitkh, who was said to be of Jordanian background. 
His private pilot certificate was valid for single-engine land aircraft. The 
airplane was registered to a flight school. The crash site was near a 
Pratt & Whitney plant. P&W manufactures aircraft engines. Two people 
in a vehicle received minor injuries.     
 
BEECH D95A
 
One person was killed and one was injured in the crash
October 4, 2016, of a twin-engine Beech D95A at Hitchcock, TX,
about 17 miles west of Galveston. The survivor called 911
to alert authorities to the crash and ask for help.
 
C208B
 
Three people have been killed in the crash of a Cessna 208B
near Togiak, AK. The airplane went down in mountainous
terrain, about 200 miles northwest of Anchorage. The airplane
was en route from Togiak to Quinhagak, which would have
been a flight of about 70 miles.  
 
MOONEY
 
Two people were killed and a third received serious
injuries in the September 25, 2016, crash of a Mooney M20J
in Hunterdon County, NJ. The single-engine airplane was
on approach to Sky Manor Airport. It struck trees and crashed
in a residential yard. A witness reportedly said the airplane had
touched down at the airport, but was traveling too fast 
and getting to close to the end of the runway, so the pilot
executed a go-around. The witness reportedly said the airplane
barely cleared trees, then entered a turn and descended.  
 
MID-AIR
 
Three people were killed on September 25, 2016, in the 
mid-air collision of a Piper Cherokee (exact model not
immediately reported) and a single-engine Cessna (exact
model not immediately reported) at  North Collins, NY.
Both aircraft departed Hamburg Airport en route to 
St. Mary's, PA, for a fly-in breakfast. The aircraft
which collided were part of a group of six aircraft
en route to St. Mary's.    
 
BE-55
 
All three people on board a twin-engine Beech B-55
were killed when it crashed at Broudus, MT, on September
17, 2016. The airplane was en route from Billings, MT,
to Rapid City, IA. 
 
PIPER
 
Two people were killed in the crash of a Piper PA-28-235 
at Lee's Summit Municipal Airport in Missouri, on September 20, 2016.
The airplane was en route from Des Moines, IA, to Lee's Summit.
It had touched down, but the pilot apparently then entered a go-around. 
The NTSB is investigating.  
 
U-2
 
One crewmember survived, but the other was killed after
ejecting from a U-2 just before it crashed at Sutter Buttes,
about 60 miles north of Sacramento, California, on 
September 20, 2016. the U-2 had taken off from Beale
Air force Base on a training mission.
 
C-182
 
A Cessna 182 crashed into a house in Gilbert, AZ, on
September 17, 2016. The two people in the house escaped
injury. The airplane had been on a night/VFR skydiving
flight. An in-flight fire had broken out, and the 
pilot and four skydivers onboard parachuted to safety.
The NTSB is investigating.
 
PIPER CUB
 
The NTSB is investigating the September 14, 2016,
crash of a PA-11 at Arcanum, OH. Both people on board
were killed. The airplane crashed in a corn field  The
airplane was reported to have been en route to
West Carrollton, OH.
 
CHEROKEE
 
All three people on board a Piper Cherokee, specific model not
reported, were killed when the airplane crashed into a parking
lot at the Reno-Tahoe International Airport in California. The
airplane had just taken off. It was reported that the airplane
was destined for San Carlos, CA. The accident occurred
on September 11, 2016. The NTSB is ivnestigating.
 
MID-AIR
 
Three people were killed in the September 7, 2016, mid-air
collision of a Diamond DA-20 and a Beech F33A at the 
West Georgia Regional Airport, Carrolton, GA. The airport
is uncontrolled. Both airplanes reportedly were in the
pattern for landing. The NTSB is investigating. 
 
WEEKEND ACCIDENTS
 
Three fatal accidents on 9/3/16 being investigated by 
the NTSB: 1 dead in gyrocopter crash at Bryant, AR,
a suburb of Little Rock; 2 killed in the crash of a 
Cessna (model not identified) at Liberty, TX;
two killed in crash of Cessna C-172 en route from
Pompano Beach to Key Largo in the water
about 4 miles south of Port Everglades, FL. 
 
ALASKA MID-AIR
 
Five people are reported to have been killed in
the mid-air collision of two airplanes about 60
milers north of Bethel, AK, on August 31, 2016.
The airplanes were a Cessna C-208 and a
Piper PA-18 Super Cub. The collision took
place about 6 miles from Russian Mission,
Alaska. The NTSB is investigating. 
 
SPARKS, NEVADA
 
A 1981 Beech Bonanza crashed while on approach
to the Reno-Tahoe International Airport, Sparks, NV.
The airplane came down in an RV park, and set
several cars and RV's on fire. The pilot of the airplane
was killed. The accident took place on August 30, 2016.
The NTSB is investigating.
 
BENTONVILLE, AR
 
A 1983 Beech Bonanza crashed while taking off from the
Bentonville Municipal Airport in Arkansas on
August 31, 2016. The pilot was killed. The airplane struck 
a hangar. The NTSB is investigating. 
 
ICE ROAD TRUCKERS
 
Darrell Ward, a participant in the television reality series 
"Ice Road Truckers," carried by The History Channel, was 
killed in the crash of a Cessna 182 on August 28, 2016, near 
Missoula, MT.  Also killed was the pilot/owner of the
aircraft. The NTSB is investigating.   
 
STEARMAN
 
The NTSB is investigating the August 27, 2016, crash of a 
Boeing PT17 Stearman during the Air Show of the Cascades
at Madras, OR. The pilot, aerobatics performer Marcus Paine,
was killed. Witnesses said the airplane was in a low altitude
loop, with its smoke trail functioning, when it struck the
ground. 
 
CESSNA
 
The model of Cessna which crashed into Lake Pontchartrain
at about 8:15 p.m., on August 27, 2016, was not immediately
identified, Two men on board the airplane were missing, while
a woman was rescued. The airplane was on approach to
Lakefront Airport at New Orleans at the time of the accident,
and had been on a local sightseeing flight. The NTSB is
investigating. 
 
PA-31
 
Six people were killed in the August 14, 2016, crash of a
Piper PA-31 at the Tuscaloosa Regional Airport, Tuscaloosa, AL.
The NTSB is investigating. The airplane was en route from
Kissimmee, FL, to Oxford, MS.  The pilot reported engine
problems and was attempting to make a precautionary
landing at Tuscaloosa.
 
BEECH 95-B55
 
The NTSB is investigating the crash of a Beech 95-B55
on August 12, 2016, in the vicinity of the Shannon Airport in
Spotsylvania County, VA. Six people were killed. The airplane
touched down about midway along the runway then started a
go-around. The airplane climbed and entered a turn, then likely
stalled. 
 
CITABRIA
 
The pilot, who was the only occupant, was killed in the 
August 13, 2016, crash of a Citabria at Birchwood Airport,
Chugiak, AK. The airplane had just departed runway
2R. The NTSB is investigating.
 
LIGHT SPORT
 
The type of light sport aircraft which crashed August 2, 2016, 
near the Van Nuys Airport in California was not immediately
identified. The pilot was killed in the accident. The airplane
struck an industrial building. The pilot had been doing touch
and goes at the airport.  
 
LANCAIR 360
 
The NTSB is investigating the August 1, 2016, crash of a
Lancair 360 homebuilt airplane at Columbia Gorge
Regional Airport, Dallesport, OR. The pilot was killed when
the airplane crashed onto a taxiway at the airport at
night.
 
BALLOON
 
All 16 people on board were killed in a hot air balloon accident
at Lockhart, TX, on July 30, 2016. The NTSB is investigating.
Initial reports indicated that a fire broke out while the balloon
was airborne, and it descended into power lines. The accident
took place at approximately 7:40 am, local time. 
 
PIPER PA-31
 
Reach Air Medical Services says the Piper PA-31 Cheyenne II
which crashed July 29, 2016, in Humboldt County, California,
carried the pilot, two medical personnel and a patient.  
However, as of Friday afternoon, only two bodies had been
located. The airplane was on a night flight from Crescent
City to Oakland, California. The pilot declared an emergency
due to smoke in the cockpit and stated that he was returning
to Crescent City.  The NTSB is investigating.
 
CESSNA 310
 
Four people were killed in the crash of a Cessna 310 near
the Columbia Airport, Columbia, CA, on July 27, 2016.
The airplane was on approach for landing at the time.
A post crash fire erupted. The NTSB is investigating.
 
BEECH BARON
 
The NTSB is investigating the July 25, 2016, crash of a Beech
Baron at Leshara, Nebraska. Both people on board were killed.
One was identified as a serviceman assigned to Offutt Air Force
Base. The other was identified as a civilian flight instructor. 
The airplane was registered to the successor organization to 
the Offutt Aero Club. 
 
RV-9A
 
The people who were killed in the July 22, 2016, crash of a 
homebuilt RV-9A in Harmony Township, Ohio, about 40 miles
east of Dayton, have been identified as the former Mayor of
Allen Park, Ohio, Levon King, and his wife. The NTSB is
investigating the accident, It is reported there was rain in
the area, with occasional thunderstorms. 
 
AIR TRACTOR
 
The NTSB is investigating the July 23, 2016, mid-air collision of 
two Air Tractor cropdusters near Knights Landing in Yolo County,
California. The pilot of one of the airplanes was killed, while the
pilot of the other escaped with minor injuries.  
 
PA-30
 
The NTSB has started investigating the July 21, 2016, crash of a
Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche in a residential neighborhood of Plainfield, IL, south
of Chicago. The pilot, who is believed to have been the only person
on board, was killed. A house was set on fire as a result of the crash
and post crash fire. It is believed the airplane began its journey in
Florida, stopped in Tennessee and was en route to Wisconsin.   
 
AERONCA
 
The NTSB is investigating the July 18, 2016, crash of a single-engine
Aeronca 11AC at Ely Township, MI. Both occupants were killed. 
 
DA-40
 
A single-engine Diamond DA-40 crashed on July 18, 2016, at Hyrum, UT.
The student pilot, who was the only occupant, was killed.  The airplane
had taken off from the Logan-Cache Airport in Utah. The student was attending
Utah state University's aviation program. the NTSB is investigating. 
 
PA-28
 
Three people were killed and a fourth seriously injured in the crash of
a single-engine Piper PA-28 at Esperance, NY, on July 16, 2016. The aircraft
model was not immediately identified, beyond being a four-seat Piper PA-28.
The airplane was taking off from Hogan Airport in Esperance at about 6:45 p.m.
It crashed about 1,000 feet beyond the departure end of the runway.
Esperance is located in Schoharie County in upstate New York. The
NTSB is investigating.
 
PA-32
 
The NTSB is investigating the July 8, 2016, crash of a six-seat single-engine
Piper PA-32 near the West Houston Airport, Houston, TX. All 4 people on board
were killed. There was a post crash fire. The airplane had just taken off
from the airport. 
 
BELL 525
 
Two test pilots were killed in the crash of a prototype Bell 525 helicopter which
had been undergoing flight testing. The twin-engine helicopter went down at 
Chamber Creek, TX, on July 6, 2016. The new model is expected to receive
approval to enter commercial service sometime next year. The helicopter
which crashed had been undergoing testing for about a year. The NTSB is
investigating. Bell Helicopter has two other 525's which also have been in
the test program.  
 
 
VANS RV7 FOUND
 
Wreckage of the Vans RV7 which was reported missing on July 3, 2016,
was found on July 4, 2016, by the Civil Air Patrol near Florida City, FL. 
The pilot, who was the only occupant, was killed. The airplane had 
departed from the airport at Boca Raton, FL. The NTSB will be
investigating.  
 
BUENA VISTA
 
A single-engine airplane, type not yet reported, crashed at 
Buena Vista, CO, July 4, 2016, killing the pilot.
 
PA-22
 
The NTSB is investigating the July 3, 2016, crash of a Piper PA-22
airplane at Frankenmuth, MI, in which both occupants were killed.
The airplane went down in a field. It was reported to have been based
at Zehnder field in Frankenmuth.
 
INHOFE
 
Senator Jim Inhofe, Republican of Oklahoma, escaped serious injury on 
Saturday, July 3, 2016, when the single-engine airplane he was flying
ran off a runway at South Grand Lake Regional Airport, Ketchum, OK.
There was an initial report that Inhofe had to maneuver to avoid hitting
a deer on the runway. It also was suggested that a gust of wind may have
caused Inhofe to lose control. Inhofe was reported to have been forced to 
make a precautionary landing in the Harmon Rocket because of adverse 
weather which had moved into the area.   
 
PRELIMINARY REPORT P-47D
 
On May 27, 2016, about 1930 eastern daylight time, a Republic P-47D, N1345B, 
ditched in the Hudson River following a reported loss of engine power. The 
commercial pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. 
The experimental, exhibition-category airplane was registered to a corporation 
and was operated by the American Airpower Museum under the provisions of Title 
14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an aerial observation flight. Day, visual 
meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan 
was filed. The local flight originated from Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York, about 1900.

The accident aircraft was part of a three-ship formation and the pilot was 
participating in a photo shoot. During the flight, the pilot made a distress call 
to Newark air traffic control tower and subsequently ditched the airplane in the 
Hudson River, south of the George Washington Bridge.

The airplane impacted the water and sank. Attempts by first responders 
to rescue the pilot were unsuccessful. The wreckage was recovered from the river 
the following day and was transported to the West 30th Street Heliport, New York, New York. 
An initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the airframe was generally intact. 
The engine remained attached to the airframe. A cursory examination of the engine revealed 
that the number 18 cylinder on the Pratt and Whitney R-2800 radial engine was damaged, 
consistent with an in-flight occurrence. Oil was present on the exterior of the engine. 

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single engine land, 
airplane multi-engine land, airplane single engine sea, rotorcraft-helicopter, 
and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a Federal Aviation Administration 
(FAA) airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. The pilot held a FAA second 
class medical certificate and reported 6,400 total hours of flying experience on 
his medical certificate application that was dated August 5, 2015. 
 
PA-23 APACHE
 
The NTSB is investigating the June 19, 2016, crash of a twin-engine
Piper PA-23 in Hayward, California. The airplane crashed on tracks
used by the BART, Bay Area Rapid Transit, causing service to be
disrupted. The pilot was killed in the crash. A post crash fire erupted.
 
PA-31
 
Two people have been killed in the crash of a Piper PA-31
Thursday (6/16/16) about one mile east of University Airpark,
State College, Pennsylvania. The aircraft was registered to
an air ambulance service. Controllers in the tower observed
smoke coming from the airplane as it was on approach to
the airport. The NTSB is investigating.
 
CESSNA 320
 
Three people were killed in the crash on June 15, 2016, of
a Cessna 320 registered to an aerial survey company. The crash
was about one-half mile from the Central Colorado Regional
Airport, Buena Vista, Colorado.  The airplane had flown to the
airport from Longmont, Colorado. It was on a mission to take
aerial photographs. The NTSB is investigating.
 
MOONEY
 
There are reports that the pilot of the Mooney which crashed 
Saturday (6/11/16) near the Collegedale Municipal Airport in 
Tennessee told air traffic control that oil was accumulating on the 
windshield of the single-engine airplane. Two people were killed 
and two injured in the accident. It was reported that the airplane
had been en route to Chattanooga, TN, but diverted to
Collegedale when the trouble started because it was which was 
the closest airport. The NTSB is investigating. 
 
M-18
 
The NTSB is investigating the June 9, 2016, crash of a
PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader cropduster in Brunswick County,
NC. The pilot, who was the only occupant, was killed.
Investigators reportedly have learned that the airplane took off
with about 45-minutes of fuel on board. The M-18 single-engine
airplane is built in Poland.
 
AA-1B
 
The NTSB is investigating the June 10, 2016, crash of a 
Grumman American AA-1B into a townhouse building
at Hawthorne, CA. Two people on board the single-engine
airplane were killed. A fire damaged much of the townhouse.
The accident location was about one mile from the
Hawthorne Municipal Airport.
 
PIPER PA-28-140
 
Three people were killed in the June 9, 2016, crash of
a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee into a lake about one mile
from Wishek Airport, Wishek, ND. It is believed that
the airplane had just taken off from the airport when it
went down in May Lake. The airport is uncontrolled and
investigators were attempting to locate witnesses.
 
CIRRUS SR20
 
The NTSB will be investigating today's (6/9/16) crash
of a single-engine Cirrus SR20 in a parking lot near
Houston Hobby Airport, Houston, TX. Three people were
killed, all believed to have been aboard the airplane.
The airplane struck a car, believed to have been empty,
outside of an Ace Hardware store. 
 
F/A-18 HORNET
 
Both military and civilian investigators will look into the
June 2, 2016, crash of a Navy F/A-18 Hornet jet on June 2, 2016,
at Smyrna, GA. The airplane was being operated as part of the
Navy's Blue Angels aerial performance group. The pilot was 
killed in the accident. The Blue Angels were practicing for
their appearance in this weekend's Great Tennessee Airshow
at the Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport. 
 
C150K
 
The NTSB is investigating the June 1, 2016, crash of a Cessna 150K
in Ector County, TX. The airplane was being operated by an aerial
patrol company. at about 11 pm local time, it struck a concrete
silo. The pilot was killed.
 
VARIEZE
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 28, 2016, crash of
single-engine VariEze homebuilt aircraft in a lemon orchard 
between Ventura and Santa Paula, CA. Both people on board 
were killed. The two-seat canard airplane was involved in a 
post crash fire.    
 
P-47
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 27, 2016, crash of a
World War II airplane into New York City's Hudson River.
The P-47 Thunderbolt had departed Republic Airport in 
Farmingdale,  NY.  It was scheduled to perform in a 
Memorial Day airshow at Jones Beach. Witnesses reported
seeing smoke trailing from the engine area while it was
descending to the water. The pilot made an emergency
radio call on the emergency frequency, 121.5. which was heard
by FAA air traffic control. Witness said the airplane sank
quickly, and they could see the pilot, who was the only occupant, 
struggling to open the canopy.  Divers recovered a body from
the aircraft.   
 
LIGHT SPORT KP-5
 
Both occupants were killed in the May 24, 2016, crash of a
Sihlavan KP-5 light sport aircraft near Rhoadsville, VA. The
flight originated at the Orange County Airport in Virginia. 
The KP-5 is a low wing, two seat light sport aircraft with a 
tilt-up canopy. The NTSB is investigating the accident.  
 
CESSNA 182H
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 23, 2016, crash of a Cessna 182H
near Hanapepe on the island of Kauai, HI, in which all 5 people on
board were killed. The airplane was being used for a skydiving flight.
It carried a pilot, two instructors, and two individuals who were planning
to make tandem jumps with the instructors. The airplane had taken off
from the Port Allen Airport. A post crash fire broke out.  
 
AT-6
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 17, 2016, crash of a North American
AT-6  at Mesa, AZ, in which both occupants were killed. There was a 
post crash fire. The airplane had taken off from Falcon Field at
Mesa shortly before it went down on a road at the airport's perimeter.
It was believed that the airplane World War II vintage aircraft was
built in 1942.
 
BEECH B36
 
All four people aboard were killed May 16, 2016, when a Beech B36 Bonanza
crashed shortly after taking off from the Tupelo Municipal Airport in
Mississippi. An FAA report indicates that the pilot reported smoke
in the cockpit shortly before the crash. The airplane had flown to
Tupelo from Kerrville, TX, on Sunday. It was en route on Monday from
Tupelo to Charlottesville, VA. The NTSB will be investigating.
 
CESSNA 182
 
The pilot apparently was the only occupant of a Cessna 182 which
crashed on May 15, 2016, in the Angeles National Forest, north
of Altadena, CA. He was killed. The airplane was en route from
San Diego to Santa Monica Municipal Airport in California. Contact
with ATC was lost about 17 miles east of Van Nuys, CA. The crash
site was near Brown Mountain in the national forest.
 
PITTS
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 14, 2016, crash of a Pitts
biplane being used in an air show at the Peachtree-DeKalb Airport,
Chamblee, GA. The pilot was killed when the airplane crashed and
burned during an aerobatic display.
 
BEECH G35
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 7, 2016, crash of a Beech G35
single-engine airplane in a gated community in Surprise, AZ.
The pilot was killed and a passenger received serious injuries.
Surprise is near Phoenix.  
 
ROOFTOP LANDING
 
The pilot of a 1961 Piper PA-28 executed an emergency landing to
the roof of a building in Pomona, CA, on May 8, 2016. He was the 
only occupant of the airplane, and received serious injuries. He reported
that the Lycoming O-320 engine lost power. The airplane was en route
from Fullerton, CA, to Pomona in day/VFR conditions. 
 
BEECH B-35
 
The NTSB is investigating the May 3, 2016, crash of a Beech B-35
at Syosset, NY, in which all three occupants were killed. The airplane
apparently broke up in-flight. The pilot had declared an emergency with 
ATC, stating that he was "losing the panel." The flight originated from
Myrtle Beach, SC, and was en route to Robertson Field, Plainville,
CT. The debris field stretched for about two miles.  
 
PIPER PA-32
 
The pilot was killed and the two passengers were hospitalized in
critical condition when the six-seat single-engine Piper PA-32 they
were on crashed on the Boone Golf Course at Boone, NC. The
accident took place at about 1pm on April 25, 2016. The airplane had
just taken off from the Boone Airport. The NTSB is in charge of the
investigation.  
 
BEECH 76
 
The NTSB will be investigating the April 25, 2016, crash of a single-engine
Beech 76 in a residential neighborhood of Pompano Beach, FL. The airplane
was being used to practice touch and go landings at the Pompano Beach
Airport. It was registered to the Florida Aviation Academy. The airplane
wreckage hit several houses, setting fire to at least one. The three occupants
of the airplane was removed in critical condition.
   
CESSNA 172
 
An NTSB investigator was dispatched to the scene of the April 20, 2016,
crash of a Cessna 172 single-engine airplane at Chugiak, AK. Four people
were aboard the airplane; all were killed in the crash and post crash fire.
Chugiak is about 20 miles northeast of Anchorage, AK.  
 
BEECH 65
 
A Beech 65 being used for mosquito control spraying crashed while returning
to land at the airport in Slidell, LA. The airplane was one of two on the night
mission. The accident took place at about 9:30 p.m., on April 19, 2016. Both
people on the B-65 were killed. The airplane struck power lines and a tree. A
post crash fire erupted.      
 
VAN'S RV-12
 
The NTSB will be involved in investigating the April 19, 2016, crash of a Van's RV-12 
single-engine aircraft short of runway 29 at the Bay Bridge Airport, Kent Island, MD.
Both occupants were killed. A post crash fire consumed much of the aircraft. The
Chesapeake Sport Pilot group said an aircraft "associated" with it had been involved
in an accident and the group would be cooperating with investigators in trying to
determine what caused the crash.  
 
CESSNA 206
 
The NTSB planned to send investigators from its Seattle, WA, and Anchorage, AK, offices to Admiralty
Island, south of Juneau, AK, where a Cessna 206 airplane crashed on April 8, 2016, killing three of
the people on board, including the pilot. One passenger survived and was taken to a hospital in
Juneau for treatment. He was subsequently flown to a medical center in Seattle, WA. The airplane
had been en route from Wrangell, AK, to Angoon on Admiralty Island. The airplane crashed at an
elevation of about 2,300 feet in mountainous terrain on the southeast end of the island. The airplane's
ELT activated. The Coast Guard launched a search and a commercial helicopter changed course to
help investigate. The commercial helicopter located the wreckage. A Coast Guard helicopter lowered
rescuers to the crash site since terrain conditions prevented landing. The airplane was registered to
Sunrise Aviation, a Part 135 charter operator in Wrangell, AK.     
 
BELL 206
 
The NTSB is investigating the April 4, 2016, crash of a Bell 206 helicopter being used for sightseeing
near Great Smoky Mountains National Park at Sevierville, TN. All five people on board
were killed in the crash and post impact fire. The crash site was at the foot of a mountain, about
a mile from a shopping mall and three miles from the Dollywood Theme Park founded by
singer/actress Dolly Parton. Much of the helicopter was consumed by the fire.  
 
LANCAIR
 
The NTSB is investigating the April 2, 2016, crash of a Lancair IV kit-built airplane on Interstate 15
near Fallbrook, CA. The airplane struck a car that was stopped alongside the road. A woman in
the car was killed, and the driver and two passengers received serious injuries. The pilot of the
airplane and his passenger received serious injuries. A witnesses told the California Highway
Patrol that he did not hear any sound from the airplane's engine as it descended. The airplane
slid about 250 feet after touching down before it struck the car.
 
CESSNA 172

The NTSB is investigating the March 26, 2016, accident involving a Cessna 172 Skyhawk at Yeager 
airport, Charleston, West Virginia. The flight instructor was killed, and the student received serious
injuries. The airplane was taking off from runway 05 when it flipped over and caught fire. The 
accident took place at about 12:15 p.m. The fire was extinguished, and the two people on board 
were removed and transported to a hospital, where the flight instructor died. 

EUROCOPTER AS350

There was low visibility in fog at the time a Eurocopter AS350 medical helicopter crashed 
March 26, 2016, after responding to a single-car accident near Goodman, Alabama. An NTSB 
spokesman says the crash site is wooded and swampy, and equipment was being brought in to 
move the helicopter after an initial of the accident site. The pilot, a nurse, a medic, and the patient 
on board all were killed. 

The helicopter's operator, Metro Aviation, operates about 130 helicopters based in 18 states. The 
helicopter had responded to the automobile accident at about 11 p.m., Saturday night. It was 
reported missing early Sunday morning. The wreckage was discovered about 7:00 a.m., Sunday 
morning about one-half mile from the scene of the car wreck. 

 

BOEING 737-800

 

The NTSB, along with investigators from the FAA and Boeing, will take part in the investigation

into the March 19, 2016, crash of a Flydubai Boeing 737-800 in the Rostov region of southwest Russia.

All 62 people on board Flight 981 from Dubai were killed. There were seven crewmembers and

55 passengers.

 

It is believed the airplane was starting its second missed approach when the

crash occurred. The crash site was 800 feet short of the runway at Rostov-on-Don Airport,

which could be consistent with a missed approach procedure having begun. The accident

occurred at about 3:50 a.m., local time according to Russian officials. They said weather

at the time included wind gusts to 60 mph and reduced visibility. They said the airplane had

been holding for about two hours waiting for improved weather conditions. The Cockpit Voice

Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder have been recovered.

 

The U.S. representatives were invited to participate in the investigation because the airplane's

manufacturer, Boeing, is a U.S. company.            

 

CESSNA 340

 

Two people are reported to have been killed in the March 18, 2016, crash of a Cessna 340

twin-engine airplane at Peter O. Knight Airport, Tampa, FL. The accident occurred at

about 11:45 a.m. The airplane was destroyed in the crash and a post crash fire. The

airplane was en route to Pensacola, FL. The airport is located a couple of miles south of

downtown Tampa. The NTSB will be investigating along with the FAA.   

 

C182A


The NTSB is investigating the March 13, 2016, crash of a Cessna 182A about a mile north of the

airport in Alpine, Wyoming. The accident site is near the Idaho-Wyoming border. All four people

on board were killed. A post crash fire consumed most of the airplane. The 182A was built in

1958 according to the FAA Aircraft Registry.

 

TRAVEL AIR 4000

It took a couple of days for investigators to identify the airplane which crashed and two individuals

who were killed on March 2, 2016, at Palmer Lake, Colorado. Very little remained of the airplane due

to an intense post crash fire. The NTSB is investigating the crash which involved a Curtiss Wright

TravelAir 4000, which dated from about 1928. The pilot was identified as Daniel Murray of

Longmont, Colorado, who was the owner of the airplane. The passenger was identified as Jeff Caplitz

of Lafayette, Colorado. The airplane was based at Vance Brand Municipal Airport. The passenger

was reported to also have owned vintage airplanes.

 

RV-6

 

The NTSB is investigating the March 1, 2016, crash of an experimental Vans RV-6 airplane

at Elmdale Airpark, Abilene, Texas.  The crash occurred about 8:50 a.m. Both people

on board the single-engine airplane were killed. Witnesses said the airplane appeared to

stall during takeoff and hit terrain on the north end of the runway.

 

SR-20

 

The NTSB is investigating the crash Sunday morning, February 28, 2016, of a Cirrus SR-20

near the Navasota Municipal Airport in Texas in which two adults and two children were killed.

Preliminary information indicates that the single-engine airplane took off from David Wayne

Hooks Airport in Houston about 8:17 a.m. The crash site was about 34 nautical miles

southeast of Hooks Airport. The wreckage was spotted at about 9:17 a.m. by a pilot

who was flying over wooded terrain about one-half mile southeast of the Navasota

airport. It was reported that the airplane is registered to a company in Houston. 

 

CESSNA 208B

 

On Friday, February 26, 2016, the NTSB adopted a probable cause of the November 29, 2013

crash of a Cessna 206B operated as a Part 135 passenger flight at St. Mary's, Alaska.

Four people were killed and six seriously injured.

 

The scheduled commuter flight departed 40 minutes late for a two-stop flight. During the first leg of the

night VFR flight, weather at the first destination airport deteriorated, so the pilot diverted to the second

destination airport. The pilot requested and received a special VFR clearance from an air route traffic

controller into the diversion airport area. Review of automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast data

transmitted by the airplane showed that, after the clearance was issued, the airplane's track changed

and proceeded in a direct line to the diversion airport.

Post accident examination of the pilot's radio showed that his audio panel was selected to the air

route traffic control center (ARTCC) frequency rather than the destination airport frequency; therefore,

although the pilot attempted to activate the pilot-controlled lighting at the destination airport, as heard

on the ARTCC frequency, it did not activate. Further, witnesses on the ground at St. Mary's reported

that the airport lighting system was not activated when they saw the accident airplane fly over, and then

proceed away from the airport. Witnesses in the area described the weather at the airport as deteriorating

with fog and ice. About 1 mile from the runway, the airplane began to descend, followed by a descending

right turn and controlled flight into terrain. The pilot appeared to be in control of the airplane up to the point

of the right descending turn. Given the lack of runway lighting, the restricted visibility due to fog, and the

witness statements, the pilot likely lost situational awareness of the airplane's geographic position, which

led to his subsequent controlled flight into terrain.

A review of FAA surveillance activities revealed that aviation safety inspectors had performed numerous

operational control inspections and repeatedly noted deficiencies within the company's training, risk

management, and operational control procedures. Enforcement Information System records indicated

that FAA inspectors observed multiple incidences of the operator's noncompliance related to flight

operations and that they opened investigations; however, the investigations were closed after only

administrative action had been taken. Therefore, although FAA inspectors were providing surveillance

and noting discrepancies within the company's procedures and processes, the FAA did not hold the

operator sufficiently accountable for correcting the types of operational deficiencies evident in this

accident, such as the operator's failure to comply with its operations specifications, operations

training manual, and applicable federal regulations.


The NTSB determined that the probable cause of this accident was the pilot's decision to initiate

a visual flight rules approach into an area of instrument meteorological conditions at night and the

flight coordinators' release of the flight without discussing the risks with the pilot, which resulted

in the pilot experiencing a loss of situational awareness and subsequent controlled flight into

terrain. Contributing to the accident were the operator's inadequate procedures for operational

control and flight release and its inadequate training and oversight of operational control personnel.

Also contributing to the accident was the FAA's failure to hold the operator accountable for correcting

known operational deficiencies and ensuring compliance with its operational control procedures.

HAWAII HELICOPTER

 

The NTSB has interviewed the pilot of the Bell 206B helicopter which was damaged when it

impacted water during an emergency landing near Honolulu, HI, on February 18, 2016. Video

of the helicopter impacting the water was widely seen. The helicopter was registered to a

private individual and operated by Genesis Helicopters under Part 91 as a local air tour flight.

The commercial pilot and 2 passengers sustained serious injuries, 1 passenger sustained minor injuries,

and 1 passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company

flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight originated from the Honolulu International Airport (HLN).

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight over Ford Island, he felt a vibration followed by

a grinding noise. Shortly after, the pilot heard a loud bang, scanned the instrument panel and saw

that the engine instruments indicated the engine was still running, however, rotor rpm decreasing.

The pilot initiated an autorotation to a grassy area near Contemplation Circle at the World War II Valor

in the Pacific National Monument. As the pilot neared his intended landing area, he observed multiple

people within the area. The pilot stated he initiated a left pedal turn, attempting to land close to the shoreline.

Subsequently, the helicopter descended rapidly into the water, about 20 feet from the shoreline.

The helicopter was submerged in about 40 feet of water, about 20 feet from the shoreline. The helicopter

was removed from the water the day following the accident and was subsequently rinsed with fresh water.

All major structural components of the helicopter were recovered.  

 

PIPER PA-28

 

One person remains missing in the ditching of a Piper PA-28 (exact model not

reported) single-engine aircraft into Port Jefferson Harbor, NY, an inlet of the

Long Island Sound. Four people were on board. Three were rescued from the

water and treated at a local hospital. Initial information indicates that the airplane

had flown from Republic Airport, Farmingdale, NY, to Fitchburg, MA, and

was returning to Farmingdale. A student pilot and his instructor were

occupying the front seats. When the airplane began experiencing engine

trouble, the instructor assumed control and executed the forced landing

in the water. That was at about 11 pm on Friday, February 20, 2016.

Neither the airplane wreckage nor the fourth person had been located

as of approximately 10 am Saturday. The NTSB will join the FAA

in the investigation.   

 

PIPER PA-28-181

 

Two bodies have been recovered from the wreckage of a single-engine Piper PA-28

which crashed into water near Destin, Florida, shortly before 7 p.m., on February 11, 2016.

The airplane was reported overdue at the Destin airport. A witness called 911 and

reported seeing the airplane go into the water not far from Henderson Beach where he

had been running. It was not immediately known where the airplane was based, or

where the flight originated. The NTSB is investigating.     

 

FLIGHT DESIGN CTLS

 

The NTSB is investigating the February 10, 2016, crash of a Flight Design

CTLS light sport aircraft near Springville, California, in which the pilot and

a Tulare County Deputy Sheriff were killed. They had been on a flight to

spot a man with a gun near Porterville, California. The man was subsequently

captured by law enforcement personnel on the ground. The airplane struck

a hillside adjacent to a highway.   

 

SAN PEDRO MID-AIR

 

A Citabria and a Beech 35 Bonanza collided over the ocean off San Pedo, California,

on February 5, 2016. the two men on the B-35 and the woman on the Citabria are

presumed to have been killed. The Coast Guard suspended its search for survivors.

Divers found found pieces of wreckage and a logbook belonging to one of the

occupants of the B-35. Both airplanes departed from the Torrance Municipal

Airport.

 

FORMER SIKORSKY PRESIDENT

 

The NTSB is investigating the February 5, 2016, crash of a P-51D Mustang

near Maricopa, Arizona, in which the former president of Sikorsky Aircraft

was killed. Jeffrey Pinto, age 61, was identified as having been the pilot of the

airplane. He had been president of Sikorsky, based in Stratford, Connecticut,

from 2006 to 2012. The airplane's other occupant was identified as Nickolas

Tramontano, of Brookfield, Connecticut. The Mustang is a World War Two

single-engine fighter.

 

CESSNA 182

 

Two members of the Civil Air Patrol in Albama were killed in the February 1, 2016, crash of a

Cessna 182 operated by the CAP about one mile west of the Mobile Regional Airport. The

wreckage was located about 2 am on February 2 when searchers were able to track the

airplane's Emergency Locator Transmitter signal. The CAP members had flown a medical patient to

Louisiana Regional Airport near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and were returning to Mobile.

The pilot was identified as Maj. David R. Mauritson, formerly president of the Flying

Physicians Association. He received the FPA's Distinguished Service Award in 2004.

The other crewmember was Second Lt. Phil J. Dryden, who was the Assistant Operations

Officer for the CAP in Mobile.

 

ECHO P-92

 

The NTSB is investigating the crash of an Echo P-92 light sport aircraft on February 1, 2016, at

the Houston Southwest Airport in Arcola, Texas. The flight instructor was killed and the student

received serious injuries. A post crash fire erupted. The airplane impacted next to a hangar.

 

CESSNA CITATION 525

 

The NTSB is investigating the January 18, 2016, crash of a Cessna Citation 525 near Cedar Fort,

Utah. Both occupants were killed. The pilot was identified as Donald L. Baker, a commercial real

estate operator from Tucson, Arizona, and his wife. The airplane had departed Salt Lake City and was en route to

Tucson. Witnesses reportedly told the Utah County Sheriff's Office that they heard a loud noise and saw the airplane

on fire as it descended. It was reported that Baker had attended a conference in Park City, Utah. The Citation jet can be

flown single-pilot under an exemption issued by the FAA provided the airplane meets certain equipment requirements

and the pilot meets certain rating and experience requirements.

 

BEECH A36

 

On December 11, 2015, at approximately 1420 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36

was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain after a loss of control during a return to the

airport, after takeoff from Nemacolin Airport (PA88), Farmington, Pennsylvania, The certificated

private pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for

Part 91 personal flight, destined for Montgomery County Airport (GAI), Gaithersburg, Maryland.

According to witness statements, after departure from runway 23 at PA88, the landing gear on the airplane was

observed to retract, and the airplane "made a sudden turn like it was trying to turn around." The landing gear then

extended into the down position. The airplane was next observed turning onto a close in, left base leg for

runway 23 "pretty low" to the ground, about 800 yards from the Nemacolin Woodlands Resort Outdoor Animal

Exhibits Area, and then was lost from sight as it passed behind the resort's Panoramic Pavilion. Moments later the

sound of the airplane impacting trees and then the ground was heard, and a "fireball" and smoke was observed to

rise into the air.

The airplane came to rest in a heavily wooded area located next to the 11th fairway of the resort's Links Golf Course

and was subject to a pos crash fire.
 

 

BELL 407 MEDICAL HELICOPTER

 

On December 10, 2015, about 1908 Pacific standard time, a Bell 407 was destroyed

when it impacted terrain during cruise flight near McFarland, California. The helicopter was registered

to American Airborne EMS, Fresno, California, and operated by Rogers Helicopters, DBA SkyLife,

under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. The Air Medical Flight call sign

was SkyLife 4. The commercial pilot, flight paramedic, flight nurse, and patient sustained fatal injuries.

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the flight.

The cross-country flight originated from the Porterville Municipal Airport, Porterville, California,

at 1851 with an intended destination of the San Joaquin Memorial Hospital, Bakersfield, California.

Information provided by the operator, FAA, and local law enforcement revealed that the helicopter was

initially dispatched from Visalia, California, to Porterville to facilitate transfer of a patient to a hospital in Bakersfield.

At 1918, a dispatcher radioed the pilot to confirm their status; there was no response. The dispatcher inquired with

the destination hospital, and personnel at Bakersfield Meadows Airport and verified the flight had not reached the

intended destination. Shortly thereafter, law enforcement personnel began a search near the last known location of

SkyLife 4. The FAA subsequently issued an Alert Notification (ALNOT) at 2034. The wreckage was later located

by local law enforcement air units at 2054.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the helicopter impacted open hilly terrain about 9 miles east of

McFarland. All major structural components of the helicopter were located within the wreckage debris path,

that was about 465 feet in length, and oriented on a heading of about 037 degrees magnetic. The wreckage

was recovered to a secure location for further examination.
 

CESSNA 500

 

The NTSB has adopted a probable cause of the October 18, 2013, accident at Derby, Kansas,

involving a Cessna 500 jet in which the pilot and passenger were killed.

 

After climbing to and leveling at 15,000 feet, the airplane departed controlled flight, descended

rapidly in a nose-down vertical dive, and impacted terrain; an explosion and post accident fire occurred.

Evidence at the accident site revealed that most of the wreckage was located in or near a single impact crater;

however, the outer portion of the left wing impacted the ground about 1/2 mile from the main wreckage.

Following the previous flight, the pilot reported to a maintenance person in another state that he had

several malfunctioning flight instruments, including the autopilot, the horizontal situation indicator,

and the artificial horizon gyros. The pilot, who was not a mechanic, had maintenance personnel replace the right side

artificial horizon gyro but did not have any other maintenance performed at that time. The pilot was approved

 under an FAA exemption to operate the airplane as a single pilot; however, the exemption required that all equipment

must be operational, including a fully functioning autopilot, flight director, and gyroscopic flight instruments. Despite the

 malfunctioning instruments, the pilot chose to take off and fly in instrument meteorological conditions.

At the time of the loss of control, the airplane had just entered an area with supercooled large water droplets

 and severe icing, which would have affected the airplane's flying characteristics. At the same time, the air traffic

 controller provided the pilot with a radio frequency change, a change in assigned altitude, and a slight routing change.

It is likely that these instructions increased the pilot's workload as the airplane began to rapidly accumulate structural icing.

Because of the malfunctioning instruments, it is likely that the pilot became disoriented while attempting to

maneuver and maintain control of the airplane as the ice accumulated, which led to a loss of control.


The NTSB determined that the probable cause of this accident was the airplane's encounter with severe

icing conditions, which resulted in structural icing, and the pilot's increased workload and subsequent

disorientation while maneuvering in IFR conditions with malfunctioning flight instruments, which

led to the subsequent loss of airplane control. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to take

off in IFR conditions and fly a single-pilot operation without a functioning autopilot and with malfunctioning

flight instruments. 

 
HAWKER JET
 
On November 10, 2015, about 1452 eastern standard time (EST), Execuflight flight 1526, 
a British Aerospace HS 125-700A, N237WR, departed controlled flight while on approach 
to landing at Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) and impacted a 4-plex apartment 
building in Akron, Ohio. The pilot, copilot, and seven passengers died; no ground injuries 
were reported. The airplane was destroyed by the crash and a postcrash fire. The airplane 
was registered to Rais Group International NC LLC and operated by Execuflight under the 
provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand charter flight. 
Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight 
plan was filed. The flight departed from Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), Dayton, Ohio, 
about 1413 EST and was destined for AKR.

The airplane, which was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 
departed Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, about 1112 EST on the day
 of the accident and arrived at MGY about 1125 EST. The airplane remained parked on the ramp 
at one of the fixed-base operators until departing for AKR.

According to Federal Aviation Administration air traffic control and radar data, about 1438 EST, 
the Akron-Canton terminal radar approach control facility provided radar vectors to the 
accident airplane for the localizer runway 25 instrument approach procedure at AKR. 

A Piper PA-28-161 airplane performing flight training at the airport completed the localizer 
runway 25 instrument approach procedure at AKR before the accident airplane began its approach. 
According to the flight instructor on board the Piper PA-28-161, the airplane "broke out at 
minimums" on the localizer runway 25 approach and landed on runway 25. After the Piper PA-28-161 
exited the runway, the flight instructor reported that he heard one of the pilots of the accident
 airplane state "Hawker Jet on a 10 mile final localizer 25" over the Unicom frequency. S
ubsequently, the flight instructor radioed to the accident airplane and stated "we broke out 
right at minimums." According to the flight instructor, one of the pilots of the accident airplane
 acknowledged this transmission with "thanks for the update." 

About 1452 EST, a motion-activated security camera located about 900 ft to the southeast 
of the accident site captured the airplane as it came in over the surrounding trees in 
a left-wing-down attitude about 1.8 nautical miles from the approach end of runway 25 at AKR. 
An explosion and postcrash fire were observed on the video just after the airplane flew out of 
the security camera's view.

The postcrash fire consumed most of the airplane; however, the airframe, engines, primary flight 
controls, and landing gear were all accounted for at the accident site. The airplane was equipped
 with a Fairchild GA-100 tape unit cockpit voice recorder, which was recovered and sent to the 
National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination. 

About 1450 EST, the surface weather observation at AKR was wind from 240 degrees at 7 knots; 
visibility 1 3/4 statute mile in mist; ceiling broken at 600 ft above ground level (agl); overcast
 ceiling at 900 ft agl; temperature 11 degrees C (52 degrees F); dew point 9 degrees C 
(48 degrees F); and altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury. 
 
FLIGHT 405
 
The  NTSB continues to investigate the October 29, 2015, fire on a Boeing 767
being operated as Dynamic International Airways flight 405. The airplane was
taxiing prior to takeoff at Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport (FLL), 
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, 
 
• The NTSB found that the main fuel supply line coupling assembly had disconnected
 in the wing-to-engine strut above and behind the left engine. This coupling assembly 
has been retained for further examination.
• Examination of the left engine revealed no evidence of an engine uncontained or 
other failure.
• The lower inboard portion of the left wing, left engine cowling, and left fuselage center 
section sustained thermal damage. The fire did not penetrate the fuselage.
• The FDR/CVR were transported to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory in Washington, DC, 
and are being downloaded and evaluated.
• The NTSB is reviewing the airplane maintenance records at Dynamic International Airways’ 
headquarters in North Carolina. According to the aircraft records, the accident airplane was in 
dry storage for approximately 29 months until September 2015 when Dynamic International 
Airways leased the airplane. Dynamic International Airways has operated the airplane for about 
240 hours under the present lease.
• An initial review of the airplane onboard logbook revealed there was no entry of maintenance 
action having been performed in the area of the fuel coupling prior to the accident flight while in FLL.
• NTSB investigators have interviewed the two flight crew members and nine cabin crew members.
• Of the 90 passengers and 11 crewmembers onboard the airplane, one was seriously injured and 
21 sustained minor injuries as a result of the emergency evacuation.
• Dynamic International Airways has issued a Fleet Campaign Directive to inspect the remainder 
of their aircraft to ensure proper installation of the fuel line coupling assemblies.
 
DHC-3 WITH 10 FATALITIES
 
The National Transportation Safety Board found that the probable cause for the crash of a 
deHavilland DHC-3 in Soldotna, Alaska, on July 7, 2013, was the operator’s failure to 
determine the actual cargo weight, leading to the loading and operation of the airplane 
outside of its weight and center of gravity limits.

Contributing to the accident was the Federal Aviation Administration’s failure to 
require weight and balance documentation for this type of air taxi flight.
The flight was headed from Soldotna to a lodge 90 miles away when the airplane stalled
 and crashed on takeoff. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire
 and the pilot and nine passengers were fatally injured.

A video of the airplane’s taxi, takeoff roll and takeoff was recovered from a passenger’s
 personal electronic device. An NTSB video study indicated that shortly after takeoff, 
the airplane’s angle of attack continually increased as the airplane’s airspeed decreased 
from about 68 mph to about 44 mph over a period of about 8.5 seconds. About 11 seconds 
after takeoff, airspeed and angle of attack reached values consistent with an aerodynamic stall. 
The airplane rolled right-wing-down and impacted the ground several seconds later.
The weight of the cargo recovered from the crash site, and determination of the weight of cargo 
destroyed in the impact and post-crash fire, showed the cargo weight was about 418 pounds higher 
than the cargo weight stated on the load manifest, resulting in a center of gravity aft of the 
limits for the airplane.

BEECH G35 - South Lake Tahoe, CA

On October 10, 2015 about 1735 Pacific daylight time, a Beech G35, N4485D, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near South Lake Tahoe, California. The pilot, who was the registered owner of the airplane, and the passenger sustained fatal injuries. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Lake Tahoe Airport (TVL), South Lake Tahoe, about 1733.

Several witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff from runway 18, the airplane sounded as it was not producing adequate power. One witness reported strong downdrafts in the area. As it exited the airport boundaries on the runway heading, the airplane made a right turn followed by a left turn. It climbed to about 100 feet above ground level (agl) in an excessively high pitch up attitude, and continued to fly towards the rising terrain. Shortly thereafter, after it crossed the ridgeline, the airplane entered a nose and left-wing low attitude and impacted the back yard of a residence. A post crash fire ensued.

CESSNA 182P

On October 8, 2015, at 0826 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane collided with mountainous terrain about 3.5 miles northeast of Hope, Idaho. The private pilot and the commercial pilot were fatally injured, the pilot-rated passenger has not been located and is presumed to be a fatality. The airplane impacted large pine trees near a mountain ridge line and was destroyed by a post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to the private pilot, and operated under Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at the Bird Nr 2 air strip, Sagle, Idaho, at 0816, and was destined for Minot, North Dakota.

The Bonner County Sheriff reported that at 0826 he received reports of a single emergency locator transmitter ping in the vicinity northeast of Hope. About 6 hours later a helicopter located the wreckage just below a ridgeline saddle in the mountains above Hope, at an elevation of 5,226 feet MSL. The airplane had first impacted numerous tree tops then collided with terrain about 156 feet later, along a 046-degree magnetic bearing line. There was a post-crash fire that destroyed the airplane cabin. Both pilots were located in the wreckage, however, the passenger, who had been in the rear seats of the airplane, has not been located.

Family members reported that the intended route of flight was to depart Sagle, proceed to Minot, then over to Maine, and then proceed along the east coast of the US, with a final destination of Gainesville, Florida. The flight had been planned to depart on Wednesday, October 7, but was delayed due to poor weather conditions. Just before the airplane departed the pilot-rated passenger told the ranch foreman that they were heading to Minot, but because of the weather they were probably going to try to go south. The ranch foreman also stated that on Tuesday he had fueled the airplane to maximum capacity.
 

DELTA 747

The NTSB sent investigators to Japan to look into the October 2, 2015, incident involving Delta Air Lines flight 158, a Boeing 747-451 en route from Seoul, Korea to Detroit, Michigan while operating in Russian air space, had an in-flight shutdown of the No. 3 engine, a Pratt & Whitney PW4056. The airplane diverted to Narita International Airport, Tokyo, Japan for landing. When maintenance personnel were removing the engine from the airplane, it was noted that there were several holes in the low pressure turbine case. There were nicks to the right wing's flap and aileron and the leading edge of the right horizontal stabilizer downstream from the No. 3 engine's exhaust.

PIPER SARATOGA UPDATE

On October 2, 2015, about 1512 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-301 collided with terrain following an in-flight breakup near Westminster, South Carolina. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The occupants were planning to attend a football game on October 3 between Clemson and Notre Dame. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The airplane was registered to Smith Family Aviation LLC and operated by the pilot under Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Warsaw Municipal Airport (ASW), Warsaw, Indiana and was destined for Oconee County Regional Airport (CEU), Clemson, South Carolina.

According to preliminary information provided by the FAA, the airplane was at 6,000 feet MSL, approaching ZEYLM intersection to hold for the RNAV runway 7 approach at CEU. The pilot was subsequently cleared for the approach and reported that the airplane was established outbound on the procedure turn. The controller subsequently queried the pilot when he did not report inbound on the approach; no response was received. Radar contact was lost over Lake Hartwell, on the Georgia-South Carolina border, about 2,200 feet msl.

Local residents reported hearing and seeing the airplane prior to the accident. One witness heard a loud "boom," followed by white pieces of debris falling into the lake. Another witness saw the airplane descending vertically, in a spiral motion, until it disappeared behind a tree line. Another witness reported that the engine was running until ground impact. Several witnesses reported the event to 911, and the wreckage was located by first responders shortly thereafter.

The pilot, age 71, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He reported 1,448 hours total flight time on his most recent application for an FAA third-class medical certificate, dated October 17, 2013.

The main wreckage was found inverted in a wooded area, about 50 yards north of the shoreline of Lake Hartwell, near Westminster. Damage to trees was indicative of a near-vertical descent angle at impact. There was no fire. The main wreckage consisted of the main cabin, cockpit, engine, propeller, left wing, and the inboard half of the right wing. About 10 percent of the empennage was recovered near the south shoreline the lake, near Toccoa, Georgia.

BEECH S35

Witnesses have told investigators that white smoke was coming from the underside of the Beech S35 before it crashed

at Pagosa Springs, Colorado, on September 25, 2015. The S35 single-engine airplane impacted terrain following a loss of engine power while maneuvering. The private pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed by impact and post accident fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed, nor was one required. The airplane departed the Durango-La Plata County Airport (DRO), Durango, Colorado, at an unknown time.

The airplane departed DRO with another airplane en route to Stevens Field Airport (PSO), Pagosa Springs, and the two pilots planned to participate in an air race competition in the Pagosa Springs area on September 26th. Prior to landing at PSO, the pilots in the two airplanes decided to execute a circuit in the Pagosa Springs air race course. As the airplanes entered the course, the accident airplane was behind the other airplane. After the first course waypoint, the accident pilot radioed the other pilot and stated the engine lost power, and the airplane was going down. No further communications were heard from the accident airplane.

Witnesses, who were located in the Pagosa Springs area, reported observing white smoke coming from the underside of the accident airplane. The airplane turned left, descended below rising terrain, and a smoke plume was then seen shortly thereafter. Witnesses stated the sky was clear and the winds were calm.
 

DHC-3T

The NTSB is investigating the September 15, 2015, crash of a float equipped deHavilland DHC-3T turboprop at a lake in the Southwest Alaska town of Iliamna. Three of the ten people on board were killed. The plane was taking guests of a fishing lodge to a fishing site. NTSB investigator Clint Johnson said the airplane was owned and operated by Rainbow King Lodge. It crashed on takeoff from East Wind Lake. Johnson said the passengers consisted of lodge guests and fishing guides. The accident was first reported to Alaska State Troopers at about 6:30 am.

 
 
FLIGHT 2276
 
The NTSB is investigating the September 8, 2015, engine fire that occurred during takeoff
of British Airways flight 2276, a Boeing 777-200ER, at McCarran International Airport (LAS), in
Las Vegas, NV.  NTSB investigators arrived on scene Wednesday morning local time to begin 
the on-scene investigation. The NTSB investigative team includes experts in powerplants, 
airplane systems, and fire. 
 
The initial factual findings follow.

The Part 129 flight was en route to London - Gatwick Airport (LGW), Horley, England. 
There were 157 passengers, including 1 lap child, and 13 crewmembers on board. 
There were several minor injuries as a result of the evacuation (mostly abrasions).
The flight data recorder, cockpit voice recorder and quick access recorder have arrived at the 
NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory and are currently being downloaded.
On Tuesday evening, the airplane was photographed and the runway debris documented by FAA 
and airport officials before airplane was towed to secluded area of the airport (in order to reopen the runway).
Initial examination of the left engine revealed multiple breaches of the engine case in the area 
around the high pressure compressor.
Examination of the material recovered from runway found several pieces of the high pressure 
compressor spool (approximately 7-8 inches in length).
Initial examination of the airplane by NTSB revealed that the left engine and pylon, left fuselage
structure and inboard left wing airplane were substantially damaged by the fire. 

GULFSTREAM G-IV

 

The NTSB says the probable cause of the May 31, 2014, crash of a Gulfstream G-IV business jet at Hanscom Field

in Bedford, MA, was a series of errors by an experienced flight crew. The NTSB determined that the pilots failed to perform a flight control check before takeoff, then attempted to take off while critical flight controls were locked because a gust lock was engaged. Finally, they delayed rejecting the take-off after they became aware the flight controls were locked.

At 9:40 pm EDT, the G-IV, bound for Atlantic City, NJ, overran the end of runway 11 during a rejected takeoff at Laurence G. Hanscom Field. The airplane rolled through the paved overrun area; continued across a grassy area, striking approach lights and an antenna; and traveled through the airport fence before coming to rest in a ravine. A post crash fire engulfed the airplane almost immediately. Everyone aboard – two pilots, a flight attendant and four passengers – were killed.

During the engine start process, the flight crew failed to disengage the airplane’s gust lock system, which locks the primary flight control surfaces while the plane is parked to protect them against wind gusts.

The flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder indicated that neither of the two flight crewmembers, who had flown together for about 12 years, had performed a basic flight control check that would have alerted them to the locked flight controls. A review of the flight crew’s previous 175 flights revealed that the pilots had performed complete preflight control checks on only two of them. The flight crew’s habitual noncompliance with checklists was a contributing factor to the accident.

About 26 seconds into the takeoff roll, when the airplane had reached a speed of 148 mph (129 kts), the pilot in command indicated that the flight controls were locked, but the crew did not begin to apply the brakes for another 10 seconds and did not reduce engine power until four more seconds had passed. The NTSB determined that if the crew had rejected the takeoff within 11 seconds of the pilot’s comment, the airplane would have stopped on the paved surface and the accident would have been avoided.

The G-IV gust lock system design was intended to limit the operation of the throttles when the system was engaged so that the flight crew would have an unmistakable warning that the gust lock was on should the crew attempt to take off. However, the investigation revealed that Gulfstream did not ensure that the gust lock system would sufficiently limit the throttle movement on the G-IV airplane, which allowed the pilots of the accident flight to accelerate the airplane to takeoff speed before they discovered that the flight controls were locked.

The NTSB said that the FAA’s certification of the gust lock system was inadequate because it did not require Gulfstream to perform any engineering certification tests or analysis of the G-IV gust lock system to verify that the system had met its regulatory requirements.

Also contributing to the accident were Gulfstream’s failure to ensure that the gust lock system would prevent an attempted takeoff with the gust lock engaged and the FAA’s failure to detect this inadequacy during the G-IV’s certification.
As a result of the investigation, the NTSB issued a total of five safety recommendations to the FAA, the International Business Aviation Council and the National Business Aviation Association.

In addition, the NTSB developed a Safety Alert for all pilots on the importance of following standard operating procedures and using checklists to guard against procedural errors.

 

C35 BONANZA

The pilot of a single-engine C35 Bonanza which crashed on Long Island Rail Road tracks at Hicksville, NY, on August 16, 2015, was trying to find an abandoned runway at the closed Grumman Bethpage Airport for an emergency landing, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. The pilot was killed and his passenger received serious injuries.

The Part 135 air taxi flight originated from Westhampton Beach on Long Island and was en route to Morristown, New Jersey.

According to radar data and voice communications provided by the FAA, the airplane was at 6,500 feet mean sea level about 8 nautical miles northwest of Republic Airport in Farmingdale when the pilot radioed a controller that he was "having a little bit of a problem" and may need to land at Farmingdale. The pilot then reported that he would have to "take it down…" The controller provided the relative locations of LaGuardia, JFK and Westchester airports. The pilot responded that Farmingdale was closest. The pilot then indicated that he may not make Farmingdale. The controller then provided information on the closed Grumman Bethpage Airport at Bethpage, saying there was a runway there. The pilot diverted toward Bethpage. The  pilot subsequently radioed that he could not see the runway, and the controller continued to provide heading and distance information until the airplane was lost from radar. The accident site was located about 1/4-nautical mile northwest of a former runway's approach end. At one time, the airport had two paved runways, but very little remains today. The former airport has been developed with new industrial buildings, in addition to the ones remaining from the Grumman factory.

The passenger told investigators that during cruise flight he heard a loud "pop" sound, followed by an "oil smell." The engine then began to "sputter" and lose power. The pilot tried, but failed to restart the engine.

The pilot, age 59, was identified as Westhampton restaurateur Joseph Milo. He held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument airplane ratings. He reported 3,300 hours total flight time on his most recent application for an FAA second-class medical certificate, dated December 22, 2014. Records provided by the FAA revealed that he completed a Part 135.299 line check (check ride) on June 18, 2015.

The main wreckage was found inverted and burned on the railroad tracks for the Long Island Rail Road. The wreckage debris field was about 100 feet in length and about 20 feet wide. All major structural components of the aircraft were found within the confines of the debris field. The right wing was found under the grade crossing cantilever arm, which separated from its mount structure during the initial impact. The engine was retained for further examination.

 

LOSS OF CONTROL ACCIDENTS
 
The NTSB will hold a one-day forum, free and open to the public, to examine the problem of loss-of-control crashes 
in general aviation, and explore possible solutions. The event, “Humans and Hardware: Preventing Inflight Loss 
of Control in General Aviation,” is scheduled to be held from 9 am – 5 pm ET on October 14, 2015, in Washington, D.C.

Topics addressed will include an overview of the types of loss of control accidents,  human performance and 
medical issues, potential training improvements, and technological enhancements that can reduce loss of 
control accidents.  The forum will feature presentations from pilots, instructors, general aviation advocacy
 groups, the Federal Aviation Administration, and manufacturers of potential technological countermeasures, 
among others.

FLIGHT 1851

The NTSB has opened an investigation into Saturday’s accident that occurred when a passenger jetliner suffered substantial damage following a tail strike during an attempted landing.

On August 15, 2015, at about 6:34 pm eastern daylight time, an Airbus A321, operated by American Airlines as Flight 1851 inbound from Atlanta, reportedly encountered wind shear on final approach to the Charlotte Douglas International Airport. The airplane impacted runway approach lights followed by an airplane tail to runway impact. The flight crew then performed a go-around maneuver and completed the landing. No injuries were reported; however, the airplane was substantially damaged.

The flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder have been brought to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory in Washington where they are being downloaded and analyzed.

 

TUSKEGEE AIRMAN AIRCRAFT

The NTSB is investigating the August 9, 2015, crash of a Piper PA-32R-300 registered to the Tuskegee Airmen National Historical Museum. The airplane crashed while on a night approach to the Harbor Springs Airport, Harbor Springs, MI. The pilot was killed. He was identified as Arthur Green, age 58, a Vice President of the Tuskegee Airmen National Historical Museum. He was the only person on board. He worked for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and was going to Harbor Springs for a department conference.

The main wreckage of the airplane was located in sloping and forested terrain. The nose of the airplane was oriented to the east and the main wreckage of the airplane included the fuselage, empennage, and engine and propeller assembly. The right wing separated and came to rest immediately adjacent and to the north of the main wreckage. The left wing separated and came to rest uphill and to the south of the main wreckage.

ACCIDENT STATS

The NTSB released preliminary aviation accident statistics for 2014 on August 6 showing a slight increase in fatal general aviation accidents, which increased from 222 in 2013 to 253 in 2014.

The overall number of general aviation accidents decreased slightly from 1,224 in 2013 to 1,221 in 2014. Despite reporting fewer accidents, the accident rate for general aviation aircraft increased from 6.26 per 100,000 flight hours in the previous year to 6.74 in 2014.

There were 28 accidents involving Part 121 operations (commercial air transport).

The number of accidents involving scheduled Part 135 (commuter) operations decreased from seven in 2013 to four in 2014.

On-demand Part 135 operations, which include charter, air taxi, air tour, and air medical flights, reported 35 accidents in 2014, down from 44 in 2013. The accident rate decreased from 1.30 per 100,000 flight hours in 2013 to 1.02 in 2014.

HELICOPTER FUEL SYSTEMS

The NTSB has called on the FAA to order that all newly manufactured helicopters have crashworthy fuel systems to help prevent fuel-fed fires in accidents. In 1994, the FAA imposed new crashworthiness requirements, but helicopters whose construction specs were approved before the crashworthy requirements went into effect can still be built without having a crashworthy fuel system. The NTSB says as of November 2014, the FAA aircraft registry includes more than 5,600 helicopters manufactured since 1994. However, of those, according to certification data provided by the FAA, only about 850 (or 15%) are models with crash-resistant fuel systems that meet the 1994 requirements.

HARRISON FORD ACCIDENT

The NTSB has released some details of its investigation into the March 5, 2015, accident in which actor Harrison Ford was seriously injured. Ford's 1942 Ryan Aeronautical ST3KR sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a reported loss of engine power shortly after takeoff and during initial climb-out from the Santa Monica Municipal Airport (SMO), Santa Monica, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight. Investigators reported finding a discrepancy with the main fuel metering jet which provides a constant air/fuel mixture for the engine to burn. However, a probable cause for the accident has not been adopted.

During an interview with the NTSB investigator-in-charge, Ford reported that, shortly after takeoff and about 1,100 feet mean sea level, the engine experienced a loss of power. He stated that he did not attempt an engine restart but maintained an airspeed of 85 mph and initiated a left turn back toward the airport; however, during the approach, he realized that the airplane was unable to reach the runway. Ford did not recall anything further about the accident sequence. Subsequently, the airplane struck the top of a tree that was about 65 feet tall, and then impacted the ground in an open area of a golf course. Fuel was observed leaking from the front of the airplane, and the responding fire department reported shutting off the airplane's fuel supply from the cockpit.

The main metering jet was found unscrewed from its seat and rotated laterally about 90 degrees. The internal cap, main metering jet, and seat appeared to be bright in color and polished. Portions of the jet threads appeared to be rounded off. No gasket was observed within the main metering jet housing. In addition, no evidence of thread locking compound was observed on the threads of the main metering jet or the threads of the seat.

According to the 1943 Holley Aircraft Carburetors Instruction Manual for Models 419 and 429, the actual metering of the fuel is accomplished by the main metering jet located in the passage between the discharge nozzle and the float chamber.

A review of the maintenance logbooks revealed that an extensive restoration of the airplane and engine overhaul was completed on May 21, 1998. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine had accumulated approximately 169 hours since the restoration. An entry stated that a new float and gasket were installed in the carburetor during this time. The airplane was issued a standard-normal airworthiness certificate on June 4, 1998. Review of the Holley Aircraft Carburetors Instruction Manual for Models 419 and 429, revealed that there were no pertinent instructions regarding the installation or continued maintenance of the jet assemblies. Further, no maintenance entries were located in the engine logbook regarding carburetor inspections since the overhaul.

 

MEDICAL HELICOPTER

The NTSB has determined the probable cause of the October 4, 2014, crash of a Bell 206L1+ medical helicopter at about 0155 central daylight time while on approach to the United Regional Hospital helipad, in Wichita Falls, Texas. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the flight nurse, paramedic, and patient died.

The pilot reported that he was making an approach to a hospital helipad into light wind at night when he chose to go around because he fe...lt that the approach was too high and fast. The pilot lowered the helicopter’s nose, added power, and raised the collective control, and the helicopter then entered a rapid, “violent” right spin. The helicopter was under its maximum allowable gross weight at the time of the accident, and the wind was less than 4 knots. The NTSB investigation determined that it is likely the pilot did not adequately account for the helicopter’s low airspeed when he applied power to go around, which resulted in a sudden, uncommanded right yaw due to a loss of tail rotor effectiveness.

 

SURVIVOR

 

On July 11, 2015 about 1600 Pacific daylight time, a Beechcraft A35, N8749A, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Mazama, Washington. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The second passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight, which operated on a visual rules flight plan. However, instrument meteorological conditions were reported near the accident site. The flight originated from Red Eagle Aviation (S27), Kalispell, Montana, at about 1415 mountain standard time, with an intended destination of Lynden Airport, Lynden, Washington.

On July 11, 2015, an Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued for the accident aircraft. On July 13, 2015, a survivor was located on Highway 20 near Easy Pass Head Trail, Skagit County, Washington. In a verbal statement provided to Okanogan County Sheriff's Department, she reported that she was flying home from Montana with her grandparents. The airplane flew into clouds and the pilot was using a GPS to navigate with. When the airplane exited the clouds, she could see the mountain in front of the airplane. In an attempt to gain the altitude, the pilot pulled back on the yoke but he was unsuccessful. The airplane impacted terrain, and a post-accident fire ensued. The survivor attempted to extract the pilot and the other passenger from the wreckage, but was unsuccessful.

 

F-16 / CESSNA MIDAIR COLLISION

 

The NTSB has gathered information about the July 7, 2015, midair collision of a military fighter and a civilian airplane. It appears that the military pilot was aware of the civilian airplane's presence, and the controller handling the military jet gave the pilot instructions to avoid it.

 

At 1100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150M, N3601V, and a Lockheed-Martin F-16CM, operated by the U.S. Air Force (USAF), collided in midair near Moncks Corner, South Carolina. The Cessna was destroyed during the collision, and both the private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The damaged F-16 continued to fly for an additional 3 minutes until the pilot activated the airplane's ejection system. The F-16 was destroyed following the subsequent collision with terrain and post-impact fire, while the pilot landed safely and was uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the Cessna, while the F-16 was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The Cessna departed from Berkley County Airport (MKS), Moncks Corner, South Carolina, at 1057, and was destined for Grand Strand Airport (CRE), North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; the personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The F-16 had departed from Shaw Air Force Base (SSC), Sumter, South Carolina about 1020.

According to the USAF, after departing from SSC, the F-16 proceeded to Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, where the pilot conducted two practice instrument approaches before continuing the flight to Charleston Air Force Base/International Airport (CHS), Charleston, South Carolina. According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) radar and voice communication data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the F-16 pilot contacted the approach controller at CHS about 1052 and requested to perform a practice tactical air navigation system (TACAN) instrument approach to runway 15. The controller subsequently instructed the F-16 pilot to fly a heading of 260 degrees to intercept the final approach course. At 1055, the controller instructed the F-16 pilot to descend from his present altitude of 6,000 feet to 1,600 feet. About that time, the F-16 was located about 34 nautical miles northeast of CHS.

At 1057:41, a radar target displaying a visual flight rules transponder code of 1200, and later correlated to be the accident Cessna, appeared in the vicinity of the departure end of runway 23 at MKS, at an indicated altitude of 200 feet. The Cessna continued its climb, and began tracking generally southeast over the next 3 minutes. For the duration of its flight, the pilot of the Cessna did not contact CHS approach control, nor was he required to do so. At 1100:18, the controller advised the pilot of the F-16, "traffic 12 o'clock, 2 miles, opposite direction, 1,200 [feet altitude] indicated, type unknown." The F-16 pilot responded and advised the controller that he was "looking" for the traffic. At 1100:26, the controller advised the F-16 pilot, "turn left heading 180 if you don't have that traffic in sight." The pilot responded by asking, "confirm 2 miles?" Eight seconds later, the controller stated, "if you don't have that traffic in sight turn left heading 180 immediately." Over the next 18 seconds, the track of the F-16 began turning southerly.

At 1100:49, the radar target of the F-16 was located 1/2 nautical mile northeast of the Cessna, at an indicated altitude of 1,500 feet, and was on an approximate track of 215 degrees. At that time, the Cessna reported an indicated altitude of 1,400 feet, and was established on an approximate track of 110 degrees. At 1100:52 the controller advised the F-16 pilot, "traffic passing below you 1,400 feet." At 1100:54, the radar reported altitude of the F-16 remained at 1,500 feet and no valid altitude information was returned for the radar target associated with the Cessna. At that point the targets were laterally separated by about 1,000 feet. No further radar targets were received from the Cessna, and the next radar target for the F-16 was not received until 1101:13. At 1101:19, the F-16 pilot transmitted a distress call, and no subsequent transmissions were received. Air traffic control radar continued to track the F-16 as it proceeded on a roughly southerly track, and after descending to an indicated altitude of 300 feet, radar contact was lost at 1103:17 in the vicinity of the F-16 crash site.

MID-AIR AVOIDED AT NEWARK

The NTSB says an FAA controller was responsible for an incident involving two airliners at Newark International Airport in New Jersey. The Safety Board has finished its investigation of the April 24, 2014, incident at Newark in which a Boeing 737 and an Embraer ERJ145 regional jet had a near mid-air collision. The Embraer ERJ145 was departing from runway 4R and the Boeing 737-800 arriving to land on runway 29. Neither aircraft sustained damage, and no passengers or crewmembers were injured.

ExpressJet flight 4100 (ASQ4100) was departing on runway 4R for Memphis, Tennessee. United Airlines flight 1243 (UAL1243), a Boeing 737-800, was arriving from San Francisco

The Boeing 737 pilot contacted the Newark control tower while on the visual approach to runway 29. The local controller instructed the pilot to follow a Boeing 717 ahead and then cleared the pilot to land on runway 29. When the Boeing 717 was on short final, the local controller instructed the Embraer pilot to line up and wait on runway 4R. After the Boeing 717 crossed runway 4R, the local controller cleared the Embraer for takeoff. At that time, the Boeing 737 was about 3 miles from the runway 29 threshold; however, the Embraer did not actually begin its takeoff roll until the Boeing 737 was about 1 mile from the runway 29 threshold at 200 feet above the ground. The local controller recognized that the spacing between the Boeing 737 and the Embraer was insufficient and instructed the Boeing 737 pilot to go around. The Embraer continued its takeoff. The controller then provided traffic advisories to both the Boeing 737 and Embraer pilots and instructed the Embraer pilot to maintain visual separation from the Boeing 737. The Boeing 737 subsequently overflew the Embraer at the intersection of runways 29 and 4R. According to recorded Federal Aviation Administration radar data, the closest lateral and vertical proximity between the airplanes was about 160 feet and 400 feet, respectively, which is less than the minimum separation requirements for aircraft operating on intersecting runways.

The NTSB blamed the incident on the local controller’s failure to comply with Federal Aviation Administration separation requirements for aircraft operating on intersecting runways.

JUST ADOPTED: PROBABLE CAUSE OF RICHARD ROCKEFELLER ACCIDENT

(Full report planned for our August 2015 issue)

On June 13, 2014, a Piper PA-46-500TP Meridian single-engine airplane being flown by Richard Rockefeller crashed shortly after takeoff from Westchester County Airport, White Plains, NY. Rockefeller, who was the only occupant, was killed. Richard Rockefeller was the son of banker David Rockefeller and the great-grandson of John D. Rockefeller.  The NTSB says the accident was due to Rockefeller becoming disoriented in the instrument weather conditions which existed at the time. Contributing to the accident was his self-induced pressure to make the early morning flight.

 
On the morning of the accident, Rockefeller arrived at the Millionair fixed-base operator facility at Westchester County Airport where he kept his airplane. He requested that his airplane be brought outside and prepared for an immediate departure; this occurred 1 hour 15 minutes before his scheduled departure time. Radar data showed that the airplane departed 23 minutes later. According to air traffic control data, shortly thereafter, the ground and departure controllers contacted the tower controller and asked if the airplane had departed yet; the tower controller responded, “I have no idea. We have zero visibility.” Weather conditions about the time of the accident included a 200-feet overcast ceiling with about 1/4-mile visibility.

Only five radar targets identified as the accident airplane were captured, and all of the targets were located over airport property. The first three radar targets began about midpoint of the 6,500-feet-long runway, and each of these targets was at an altitude of about 60 feet above ground level (agl). The final two targets showed the airplane in a shallow right turn, consistent with the published departure procedure track, at altitudes of 161 and 261 ft agl, respectively. The final radar target was about 1/2-mile from the accident site. Witnesses reported observing the airplane impact trees in a wings-level, slightly right-wing-down attitude at high speed. Examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies of the airplane.

Rockefeller’s personal assistant reported that the pilot had an important meeting that required his attendance on the day of the accident flight. His early arrival to the airport and his request to have the airplane prepared for an immediate departure were actions consistent with self-induced pressure to complete the flight. Due to the poor weather conditions, which were expected to continue or worsen, he likely felt pressure to expedite his departure to ensure he was able to make it to his destination and to attend the meeting. This pressure may have further affected his ability to discern the risk associated with departing in low-visibility and low-ceiling conditions. As noted, the weather conditions were so poor that the local air traffic controller stated that he could not tell whether the airplane had departed. Such weather conditions are highly conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. Further, the altitude profile depicted by the radar data and the airplane’s near wings-level attitude and high speed at impact were consistent with the pilot experiencing a form of spatial disorientation known as “somatogravic illusion,” in which the pilot errantly perceives the airplane’s acceleration as increasing pitch attitude, and efforts to hold the nose down or arrest the perception of increasing pitch attitude can exacerbate the situation. Such an illusion can be especially difficult to overcome because it typically occurs at low altitudes after takeoff, which provides little time for recognition and subsequent corrective inputs, particularly in very low-visibility conditions.
 

BOEING 747 CARGO PLANE

On July 14, 2015, the NTSB found that a National Airlines Boeing 747 freighter crashed on takeoff from Bagram Airbase, Afghanistan, because the five large military vehicles it was carrying were inadequately restrained. This led to at least one vehicle moving rearward, crippling key hydraulic systems and damaging the horizontal stabilizer components, which rendered the airplane uncontrollable. All seven crewmembers were killed in the April 29, 2013 crash.

Contributing to the accident was the Federal Aviation Administration’s inadequate oversight of National Airlines’ (NAL’s) handling of special cargo loads, such as that being carried on the accident flight. The Boeing 747-400 freighter was carrying five mine-resistant ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicles. There was no evidence found to suggest that the airplane was brought down by an explosive device or hostile acts.

“The crew took on an important mission to support American forces abroad and lost their lives not to enemy fire, but to an accident,’’ said NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart at the outset of the Board meeting. “We cannot change what happened, but in fully investigating this accident, we hope to find ways to prevent such an accident from happening again.”

The investigation found that National Airlines’ cargo operations manual not only omitted critical information from Boeing and from the cargo handling system manufacturer about properly securing cargo, but it also contained incorrect restraining methods for special cargo loads.